System Center Data Protection Manager 2007 – Gaining Access to the Local SQL 2005 database

At one last piece for you.

Upon a clean re-install of my Systems Center Data Protection Manager 2007, I noticed that I, A *Domain Administrator* did not have access to the Database.

But the system was working fine, well except after restoring I need to make an adjustment for the Report Server account as per this excellent post.  There was a phantom entry from my original Report Server account in the restored Database.  Following these instructions resolved that.

But before I *COULD* get there I needed to access the SQL database.

Fortunately there was an account with that access.  There are two accounts created locally on the computer, one that is meant to run the services and one that is meant to access the SQL database for the reports.    The former has the Administrative access.   At least it DID after I temporarily added it to the local Administrators group.  I needed to do this in a Terminal session and needed “quick and dirty” to get the job done.

The passwords for these accounts you will already know.  When you installed DPM 2007 it asked you for a password since it was going to create new two accounts.  It told you that at the beginning.  It did.  For real.  One is called “Microsoft$DPM$Acct” and is local to your server, the second is “DPMR$NameofYourServer” We’re concerned with the former, not the latter.

Use that password and the account (Microsoft$DPM$Acct) your SQL services are running underand login to the Server as THAT user.   Now access the SQL Management Studio.  You may have to Browse for the database the first time, that’s ok.

One you have the Database in front of you, you may add yourself (or whatever accounts require Admin access) to the SQL database.  A good test to see if you have enough rights, try re-enabling the SA account.  If you can do that, you’ve got the rights you need.

Really in all fairness, you don’t typically need access to that SQL database since DPM just works quietly in the background.   But if you need need to re-associate accounts, permissions or even just repair a table, you may find that access needed.

Sean
The Energized Tech

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